I. Instruction

AC-R- GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

The Board has adopted this grievance procedure to provide a local avenue for persons with disabilities to raise concerns about whether the school unit is fully meeting its obligations under state and federal laws to protect persons with disabilities. This procedure is intended to meet the requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act (34 CFR § 104.7(b)) and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (28 CFR § 35.107 (b)).

Questions about this grievance procedure should be directed to the ADA/504 compliance coordinator as listed on the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) website: https:www.cape.kl2.me.us


Step One:

A person with an identifiable disability, or someone acting on that person's behalf, may file a written grievance regarding compliance with state or federal disabilities laws with the building principal where the grievance arose, or with the ADA/504 compliance coordinator. If filed with the ADA/504 compliance coordinator, that person shall forward it to the appropriate building principal. No grievance will be heard if it involves actions that occurred more than 60 days prior to the filing of the grievance.

The building principal, after consultation with the ADA/504 compliance coordinator, shall respond in writing to the grievance within 15 working days of its receipt. Extensions of 15 working days may be allowed when necessary to address fully the issues in the grievance. The principal's written response shall be forwarded to the grievant and to the ADA/504 compliance coordinator.


Step Two:

If dissatisfied with the response, the grievant may obtain a review by the Superintendent of the principal's decision.

The grievant must request that review within 15 working days of the decision of the principal. The superintendent, after consultation with the ADA/504 compliance coordinator, shall respond in writing to the grievance within 15 working days. Extensions of 15 working days may be allowed when necessary to address full the issues in the grievance. The Superintendent's written response shall be forwarded to the grievant and the ADA/504 compliance coordinator.

Except for grievances regarding physical alterations to school buildings or grounds, the decision of the Superintendent shall be final. In the case of grievances regarding physical alterations to school buildings or grounds, a dissatisfied grievant may obtain a review by the School Board of the Superintendent's decision.

The grievant must request that review within 15 working days of the decision made by the Superintendent. The Board shall have a reasonable time to schedule a meeting on the grievance and to issue its decision.

Nothing in the grievance procedure in any way forecloses a person with a disability from seeking redress for their concerns at any time through other legal avenues, such as through the Office for Civil Rights, the Department of Justice, the Maine Human Rights Commission or the Maine Department of Education.

Questions about other legal avenues available for persons with disabilities to pursue compliance concerns under various disabilities laws should be directed to the ADA/504 compliance coordinator.

This notice is available in large print and on audio tape from the ADA/504 compliance coordinator.


Reviewed:

November 13, 2018


Adopted:






ICAA - RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS

Our school department has a long and positive history of respecting family needs within educational programming. This directive officially requests that no major examinations or school-sponsored co-curricular activities be conducted during the school day and that the introduction of new course work be minimized on dates when students of various faiths are absent in observance of Holy Days. Examples of these days are Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Good Friday.

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IGA - CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

The mission of the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) is to “empower students with the academic, personal, and social knowledge and skills needed to build fulfilling and engaged lives”. As the world changes, so too do the knowledge and skills demanded of our students. To ensure the continued success of our mission, it is imperative that existing programs and practices be regularly reviewed, evaluated, and revised.

Therefore:

  1. Each content area will develop curriculum that is aligned to the Maine Learning Results, including the Guiding Principles, and coordinated K-12.
  2. Administrators and faculty will be sensitive to changing conditions that may require modifications in curriculum.
  3. All programs and practices will be subject to ongoing review, evaluation, and revision to ensure that they meet the instructional need of students.
  4. The school system will undertake intensive curriculum development as needed and provide the requisite resources, including instructional materials and professional development.
  5. The Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent will take the lead in setting district curricular goals in accordance with state mandates, educational research, and community values and aspirations, and in developing plans to achieve them. Principals will be responsible for the implementation of curriculum in their schools.
  6. Curriculum development and revision will be accomplished with the appropriate involvement of administrators, faculty, students, community, and the Board.
  7. The Board will review and approve all substantive curriculum changes prior to implementation.
  8. The Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent will report annually, or as otherwise requested, to the Board on the status of curriculum.

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IHBA - INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS

It shall be the policy of the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) to maintain a complete individualized education program (IEP) for each student who has been identified with a disability and in need of special education services under state and federal special education laws, and who attends Cape Elizabeth public schools. The CESD shall develop these IEPs in a manner consistent with the procedural requirements of state and federal special education laws.

Student IEPs shall be reasonably calculated to provide the identified student with educational benefits in the least restrictive educational environment. The CESD shall ensure that such IEPs are in effect within 30 days of when a student is first identified as in need of special education services, and in effect no later than the beginning of each school year for subsequent IEPs. All IEPs must be reviewed at least annually, as prescribed by state and federal special education laws.

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IHBAA - REFERRAL/PRE-REFERRAL OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

It shall be the policy of the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) to refer all school-age students suspected of having a disability that requires special education to the IEP (Individual Education Program) team for an evaluation in all suspected areas of disability. Referrals of students to the IEP team may be made by parents at any time, and by professional school staff and by other persons knowledgeable about the child’s educational needs. The referral may be made regardless of the results of the initial child find activities, and/or in accordance with procedures in the general education intervention process. Other individuals or agency representatives (including representatives of the Department of Health and Human Services) with knowledge of the child may also make referrals. Any such referral should be made in accordance with procedures that may be approved by the Superintendent of Schools.

Regardless of the source of the referral, a referral will be considered received by the school department on the date that the written referral is received by the office of the Director of Special Services. It shall be signed and dated by the Director of Special Services or designee thereby indicating the date of the receipt of that referral.

The Superintendent of Schools, in consultation with the Director of Special Services, may develop procedures for referral and the use of general education interventions within the local school unit, and may from time to time amend those procedures as necessary.

Cross Reference:

-IHBAC - Child Find -IHBAA-R - Referral Procedures and General Education Interventions

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IHBAA-R (PROCEDURE)- REFERRAL/ PROCEDURES AND GENERAL EDUCATION INTERVENTIONS

The Cape Elizabeth School Department shall refer to the Individual Education Program (IEP) Team all school age students suspected of having a disability that requires special education and related services. Referrals to the IEP Team may be made by a child's parent, by professional school staff, or by others with knowledge of the child. Referrals should be made and processed consistent with these procedures.

  1. Referrals by Parents

A parent may refer his or her child to the IEP Team at any time. That referral shall be made in writing directly to the office of the Director of Special Services. Should the parent seek to make a referral through other professional staff (such as teachers, guidance counselors, or administrators), that professional staff member shall directly assist the family in making the referral in writing to the office of the Director of Special Services. Should a parent attempt to make a referral orally, professional staff shall assist the parent in reducing that referral to writing and submitting it to the office of the Director of Special Services

A parent referral shall be processed consistent with these procedures and governing timelines even if the child is receiving interventions pursuant to the school department’s general education interventions. Those pre referral procedures shall continue during the referral process, however.

  1. Referrals by Staff

Any professional employee of the school unit may refer a child to the IEP Team regardless of the results of initial child find activities, but only after completion of any general education intervention process used by the school unit. The school unit may move directly forward with the referral process in those circumstances where the school unit and parent agree to do so. Even in that situation, however, general education interventions will continue during the referral process.

Professional school staff shall prepare a referral in writing and shall submit that referral directly to the office of the Director of Special Services.

  1. Referrals by Others

Individuals or agency representatives (including representatives of the Department of Health and Human Services) with knowledge of the child may refer that child to the IEP Team regardless of the results of initial child find activities but only after completion of any general education intervention process used by the school unit. The school unit may move directly forward with the referral process in those circumstances where the school unit and parents agree to do so.  Even in that situation, however, general education interventions will continue during the referral process.

Should such a person attempt to make a referral orally, professional staff shall assist that person in reducing that referral to writing and submitting it to the office of the Director of Special Services.

  1. Receipt of Referral

Regardless of the source of the referral, a referral is received by the school unit on the date that the written referral is received by the office of the Director of Special Services It shall be signed and dated by the Special Services Director/designee, thereby indicating the date of the receipt of that referral.

  1. Time Line for Processing Referral

Once the referral has been received in the office of the Director of Special Services, the IEP Team shall review existing evaluation data and determine the need for additional evaluations. The IEP Team may conduct its review without a meeting. If additional evaluations are needed, a "consent to evaluate" form must be sent to the parent/guardian within 15 school days of receipt of the referral.  Also upon receipt of the referral (from any source), a written notice form documenting that referral shall be sent to the parent/guardian.

Once the office of the Director of Special Services receives the signed consent for evaluation back from the parent, the local unit shall have 45 calendar days to complete the evaluation and to hold an IEP Team meeting to determine whether the student qualifies for special education services. If the student is identified as a child with a disability in need of special education, the Team should develop an IEP for that child either at that same meeting or within 30 calendar days of determining that the student is eligible.

The local unit shall implement the IEP as soon as possible following the IEP Team meeting when the child is found eligible, but no later than 30 calendar days after that meeting.

  1. Transfer Students

Students who have already been identified as in need of special education services and who transfer into the school unit from another school unit within Maine (and who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous school unit in Maine) shall, on enrollment and in consultation with the parent/guardian, be provided with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the child's IEP from the previous school unit) until the local unit either adopts the child's IEP from the previous unit or develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP.

Students who have already been identified as in need of special services and who transfer into the school unit from another school unit from outside of Maine (and who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous school unit in another state) shall, on enrollment and in consultation with the parent/guardian, be provided with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the child's IEP from the previous school unit) until the local unit conducts an evaluation (if determined to be necessary by this school unit) to determine whether the student is eligible for special education and, if so, develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP.

If the transfer student's current IEP from his or her prior school unit is not available or is believed to be inappropriate by either the parent/guardian or the school, the local unit should develop a new IEP through appropriate procedures within a short time after the student enrolls at the school.

If a child transfers into the school unit after the referral timeline has begun in the previous school unit but before an eligibility determination has been made, the timeline referenced above for completing that process shall not apply if the local unit is making sufficient progress to ensure a prompt completion of the evaluation, and the parent and school unit agree to a specific time when the evaluation will be completed and the eligibility decision made.


General Education Interventions

General education interventions are general education procedures involving regular benchmark assessment of all children, using curriculum based measurements, to monitor child progress and identify those children who are at risk of failing.  Children who are at risk receive responsive interventions in the general education program that attempt to resolve the presenting problems of concern. General educators are encouraged to confer with specialists and teaching professionals, but general education personnel are responsible for the implementation of the intervention.

Cape Elizabeth School Department shall implement general education interventions.  These interventions shall include:

a. Documentation that every child, prior to entering the general education intervention process, was provided with appropriate instruction in reading, including the essential components of reading instruction (as defined in section 1208(3) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), appropriate mastery based instruction in math, appropriate instruction in the writing process, and positive behavioral supports;

b. A team-based decision-making process;

c. Screening at reasonable intervals to determine whether all children are progressing toward meeting the content standards of the parameters for essential instruction and graduation requirements;

d. Data Analysis of screening results focusing on determining to what extent all children are progressing toward meeting the content standards of the parameters for essential instruction and graduation requirements and identifying which children are not making adequate progress towards these goals and are in need of targeted general education interventions;

e. A determination as to whether a child’s assessed difficulties are likely the result of linguistic or cultural differences;

f. Provision of research-based general education interventions targeted at the child’s presenting academic and/or behavioral concerns as determined by screening results;

g. Repeated formative assessments of student response to targeted interventions, conducted at reasonable intervals, that generate rate based measurable data for both specifying academic and behavioral concerns and monitoring child progress during general education interventions;

h. Documentation that parents were notified about the process, given the opportunity to participate in instructional decision-making, and kept informed of their child’s progress during targeted general education interventions;

i. A team shall review the child’s progress no later than 60 school days after the start of formal general education interventions and approximately every 30 school days thereafter. At each meeting the team shall review data on the child’s progress to determine if modifications to the general education interventions are needed and/or if a referral to special education is indicated: and

j. Provisions for targeted general education interventions to continue during any subsequent special education referral.

The parent of a child receiving general education interventions may request that the agency conduct a full and individual evaluation for possible special education eligibility determination at any time during Cape Elizabeth School Department’s established general education intervention process. 

The general education interventions developed through this pre-referral process shall continue in the event of a referral while the referral is being handled by the IEP Team, and the resulting data shall become part of the child’s special education file.



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IHBAC - CHILD FIND

Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) seeks to ensure that all children within its jurisdiction are identified, located and evaluated who are school-age (5 through the school year in which they turn 22) and who are in need of special education and supportive assistance. This includes homeless children, state wards, state agency clients, students who have been suspended or expelled, children attending private schools receiving home instruction, children incarcerated in county jails, children who have the equivalent of 10 full days of unexcused absences or 7 consecutive school days of unexcused absences during a school year, highly mobile children (including migrant or homeless), and children who are suspected of being disabled and in need of special education and supportive assistance even though they are advancing from grade to grade.

The school unit’s Child Find responsibility shall be accomplished through a unit-wide process which, while not a definitive or final judgement of a student’s capabilities or disability, is a possible indicator of special education needs. Final identification of students with disabilities and programming for such students occurs only after an appropriate evaluation and a determination by the IEP team.

The school unit shall provide Child Find during the first 30 days of the school year or during the first 30 days of enrollment for transfer children, in addition to other Child Find activities provided by the school unit.

This Child Find process shall include obtaining data on each child through multiple measures, direct assessment, and parent information regarding the child’s academic and functional performance, gross and fine motor skills, receptive and expressive language skills, vision, hearing and cognitive skill. CESD may schedule Child Find activities during its annual kindergarten enrollment to assist in planning for necessary special education and related services at the start of the school year. If screening occurs in the spring prior to school entry, CESD will refer the child to the regional CDS site within 10 school days.

If the Child Find process indicates that a student may require special education and supportive services in order to benefit from regular education, the student shall be referred to the IEP team to determine the student’s eligibility for special education services.

School staff, parents, or agency representatives or other individuals with knowledge of the child may refer children to the IEP if they believe that the student, because of a disability, may need special education and supportive services in order to benefit from regular education. Such a referral should follow the school unit’s pre-referral and referral policy.

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IHBB - GIFTED AND TALENTED

Education should provide each gifted and/or talented learner with varied programs that challenge and motivate them to reach their fullest potential. The Board directs the Superintendent, or the Superintendent’s designees to develop and implement appropriate programs in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

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IHBEA - ENGLISH LEARNERS

The School Board recognizes the need to provide a program for students who are English learners in order to assure these students of equal educational opportunity.

The Superintendent shall appoint a Lau Plan Coordinator, who will be responsible for developing and implementing a plan to meet the needs of these students. This Lau Plan shall include procedures for screening, identification, provision of services, assessment, exiting, and monitoring. The Lau Plan Coordinator will also conduct periodic reviews of the program.

The Lau Plan shall be approved by the Board before it is submitted to the Maine Department of Education.

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IHBG - HOME INSTRUCTION PROGRAM

A student may be excused from attending public school if the student obtains equivalent home instruction through a home instruction program that complies with applicable Maine laws.

Written Notice of Intent

The student's parent or guardian must provide a written notice of intent to provide home instruction simultaneously to the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) Superintendent and the Maine Commissioner of Education within ten (10) calendar days of the beginning of home instruction. The notice must contain all of the information required by law.

Annual Assessment of Student Progress

The law requires that students in a home instruction program participate in an annual assessment of the student's academic process. If the test is administered through the school district where the student resides, the parent or guardian must obtain the agreement of the Superintendent or designee prior to submitting the written notice of intent to provide home instruction.

On or before September 1 of each subsequent year of home instruction, the student's parent or guardian shall file a letter with the CESD Superintendent and the Maine Commissioner of Education stating the intention to continue providing home instruction and enclosing a copy of one of the forms of annual assessment of the student's academic progress as specified by law.

Roster of Students Receiving Home Instruction

The Superintendent shall maintain a roster of all students eligible to attend school within the district who are receiving home instruction.

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IHBGA - HOME SCHOOLING - PARTICIPATION IN SCHOOL PROGRAMS

The Cape Elizabeth School Board acknowledges the provisions for equivalent instruction under Maine law. The Board further recognizes the Legislature's statement “that the term 'equivalent' is intended to mean meeting state standards for alternate or other instruction and is not intended to mean the same as the education delivered in the public-school system.”

In addition, it is the intention of the Board to “cooperate in the home instruction of any child who resides in the school administrative unit to the degree that the level of cooperation does not interfere with the responsibilities to the students enrolled in Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD)'s regular programs.” Furthermore, participation of students in such school programs shall be limited to home-schooled students whose home instruction programs are in compliance with applicable Maine law and Department of Education regulations.

In order to maintain an efficient and orderly school program, the Board directs the Superintendent/designee to develop procedures, as appropriate, regarding the availability of school system resources and services to home-schooled students who would otherwise be eligible to attend school in CESD. The procedures shall be in accord with the following provisions.

  1. PROVISIONS OF INFORMATION

    At the request of the student or the student's parent/guardian, the CESD shall make available to home-schooled students, in a form determined by the school, information regarding access to public school activities and attendance at CESD. The information must include:

    1. Requirements regarding initial health and development screening for motor skills, vision, hearing, and immunization; and
    2. Criteria for participation of home-schooled students in curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular activities.
  2. PERMITTED PARTICIPATION

    1. Participation in Regular Classes: Home instruction students may enroll in specific, day-school classes provided that the student's attendance is regular, the class is deemed to be age and grade appropriate, and all prerequisite course requirements are met. In addition, the following shall also apply:
      1. The student or the student's parent/guardian on the student's behalf, shall apply in writing to and receive written approval from the Superintendent/ designee. Approval may not be unreasonably withheld.
      2. The student shall demonstrate prior satisfactory academic achievement consistent with CESD policy and procedures applicable to all students.
      3. The student shall comply with behavioral, disciplinary, attendance, and other classroom rules applicable to all students. If a student fails to comply, the school may withhold credit or terminate the student's participation.
      4. Transportation must be provided by the parent/guardian or student. However, the student may use the same transportation as all other students in the school department as long as additional expenses are not incurred and vehicle capacity is not exceeded.
      5. The student shall complete all assignments and tests as required of all students in the same class.
    2. Course Auditing: Home instruction students may audit a course(s) provided the following conditions have been met:
      1. The student or the student's parent/guardian, on behalf of the student, shall apply in writing to and receive written approval from the Superintendent/ designee to audit a specific course or courses. Participation may not be unreasonably withheld.
      2. The student agrees to meet established behavioral, disciplinary, attendance, and other classroom rules applicable to all students. If a student fails to comply, the school may terminate participation.
  3. SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

    Special Education services will be available to eligible special education students in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations.

  4. ADMISSION TO REGULAR PROGRAM/PLACEMENT

    A student who has been receiving home-school instruction and who seeks admission or readmission to the regular school program will be placed in a grade commensurate with the level of the student's academic achievement. Placement must be guided by the following:

    1. Grade level placement is determined by the principal, in consultation with the appropriate school staff, based upon, but not limited to, such factors as the student's completed curricula and record of achievement, conferencing with the student's parent/guardian and administration of tests, if determined necessary.

    The final grade placement decision shall be made by the principal.

  5. USE OF SCHOOL TEXTBOOKS AND LIBRARY BOOKS

    Subject to availability, a student receiving home instruction may use school textbooks, if the number of particular copies are sufficient, and library books owned by the school department, subject to the following conditions:

    1. The use does not disrupt regular student, staff, or special program functions.
    2. The student's sign-out period for a library book is the same as that applicable to regularly enrolled students.
    3. The student may sign out a textbook for a period not exceeding one school year.
    4. The parent/guardian and student agree to reimburse the school department for lost, unreturned, or damaged library books and textbooks and for consumable supplies used.
  6. USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

    A student receiving home-school instruction may use public school facilities and equipment on the same basis as regularly enrolled students if the following conditions are met:

    1. The use does not disrupt regular school activities.
    2. The use is approved by the school principal in accordance with established school policy.
    3. The use does not create additional expense to the School Department.
    4. The use is directly related to the student's academic program.
    5. The use of potentially hazardous areas, such as shops, laboratories, and gymnasiums, is supervised by a qualified employee of the school department approved and approved by the Superintendent.
  7. MAINE EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND SAT/MHSA

    If a parent of a student in an equivalent instruction program requests to have the student participate in the Maine Comprehensive Assessment System, such request must be granted. Participation in such examinations must be in compliance with all rules and procedures governing testing conditions and must be in compliance with all rules and procedures governing testing conditions in the school unit.

  8. ACADEMIC CREDIT

    A student receiving home-school instruction must receive academic credit subject to the following requirements:

    1. Academic credit for individual courses must be awarded if the student meets required academic standards applicable to all students enrolled in the same course.
    2. Academic credit must be awarded for successful completion of alternative instruction opportunities sponsored by the school and available to all students.
  9. HIGH SCHOOL COURSE CREDITS AND DIPLOMA ELIGIBILITY
    The following standards govern the awarding of course credits and a graduation diploma to a student receiving home-school instruction who seeks admission or readmission to the high school:

    1. A student shall earn high school credits for satisfactory completion of courses in the high school pursuant to 20-A MRSA § 5021(2)(A).
    2. A student may earn credit for course work completed through home-schooled instruction if the principal determines both in advance and, upon completion of the course, that the course satisfies the requirements for awarding the credit. The principal may direct that the student undergo a test or tests to assist in making a determination relative to the awarding of credit.
    3. Requests for transfer credit for equivalent instruction completed at non-approved private schools, at private schools that elect not to meet requirements under 20-A MRSA § 2901, or through other equivalent instruction programs must be evaluated on the merits of the documentation provided. The principal and guidance staff shall conduct these evaluations on request made by the student or the student's parent/guardian. The principal may direct that the student undergo a test or tests to assist in making a determination relative to the awarding of credit.
    4. Awarding of a high school diploma by the local school is conditioned upon the student's demonstration of having satisfied all specific course credit and other requirements established by the Board. The Board may establish resident credit requirements as a precondition for the awarding of a local school department diploma.
  10. PARTICIPATION IN CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

    Students receiving home-school instruction may participate in co-curricular activities such as field trips, assemblies, and academically-related fairs provided:

    1. Prior written permission is obtained from both the parent/guardian and the principal; and
    2. The student has agreed to meet established behavioral, disciplinary, attendance, and other rules applicable to all students.
  11. PARTICIPATION IN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

    Students receiving home-school instruction are eligible to try out for extracurricular activities sponsored by the school department provided the student applies in writing if the following requirements are satisfied.

    1. The student agrees to abide by equivalent rules of participation as are applicable to regularly enrolled students participating in the activity and provides evidence that the rules of participation are being met.
    2. The student complies with the same physical examination, immunization, insurance, age, and semester eligibility requirements as regularly enrolled students participating in the activity. All required documentation must be made available upon request by the school department. The school principal is authorized to collect from the student's parent/guardian actual samples of coursework (e.g. homework, examinations, etc.) as the principal deems necessary in order to make the determination that the necessary academic standards have been met.
    3. The student meets equivalent academic standards as those established for regularly enrolled students participating in the activity and provides evidence that the academic standards are being met.
    4. The student abides by the same transportation policy as regularly enrolled students participating in the activity.
  12. APPEALS

    Appeals from administration and application of this policy are heard by the Board, whose decision is final and binding. Appeals that question whether this policy complies with legal requirements must be made to the Maine Commissioner of Education, whose decision is final and binding.

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IHCDA - POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT OPTIONS

This policy establishes the requirements for student enrollment in post-secondary courses taken before high school graduation.

Eligible Institutions

Students may take courses at eligible post-secondary institutions within Maine, which include the University of Maine System, the Maine Community College System, and Maine Maritime Academy. Students may take courses offered through the DOE Distance Learning Network or the internet if such participation is approved by the post-secondary institution.

Students may be allowed to take courses at private colleges or other institutions, including courses offered through the DOE Distance Learning Network or the internet. Responsibility for all costs associated with any courses taken at private colleges will rest with the student and the student’s parent(s).

Any such requests shall be considered on a case­ by-case basis to the extent that funds are available and the requirements of this policy are met.

Student Eligibility Requirements

A student may take no more than one course per semester and two courses per academic year.

A student must meet the following criteria prior to enrolling in a post-secondary course:

  1. Have a minimum of a B average (or 3.0) in the student’s courses overall, unless the eligible institution has waived the minimum grade/grade point requirement;
  2. Meet the course admission standards of the eligible institution;
  3. Provide evidence of parent/guardian approval for taking the course; and
  4. Receive a recommendation to take a post-secondary course or courses from the school administration or one of the student's secondary school teachers following an assessment of the student by the administration.

A student enrolled in grade 11 or 12 who does not have a B average (or 3.0) in their courses overall is eligible to take a post-secondary course provided that the student:

  1. Has been assessed and received a recommendation to take the course from the school administration or from a secondary school teacher; and
  2. Has been approved for participation in the course by an eligible institution.

Awarding of Credits

The eligible institution shall grant full credit to any student who successfully completes a course.

High school graduation credit for a course taken under this policy shall be awarded as follows:

  1. The course must meet for a minimum of one semester or for an equivalent number of credit hours.
  2. The course must meet any applicable Learning Results standards.
  3. The student must earn a passing grade in the course.
  4. Attendance must satisfy the instructor's requirements.
  5. If the above criteria are met, the student shall receive five (5) high school credits for each 45-credit hour course.
  6. The weight assigned to grades received in post-secondary courses approved pursuant to this policy shall be determined on a case by case basis by the Principal and the Guidance Director depending on the circumstances of the student' s taking the class and the course description and expectations. There shall be no presumption that grades in approved courses shall receive weight simply because they are offered by a post-secondary institution.

Financial Assistance

  1. The Maine Department of Education shall pay applicable tuition costs (up to the limits of legislative appropriation) for any student enrolled in a course under this policy if the eligible institution requires tuition payment.
  2. The student and their parent/guardian are responsible for paying for all textbooks, course fees, and transportation costs.

School District Reporting Requirements

The Superintendent shall make parents and students aware of post-secondary enrollment options through handbooks or other appropriate means.

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IIB - CLASS SIZE

The Cape Elizabeth School Board recognizes that a relationship exists between class size and pupil achievement. This relationship varies across grade levels, among subjects, and by methods of instruction. Therefore, average class size in grades K-8 and student loads in grades 9-12 shall be determined by several different variables, including grade level, subject, particular needs of the student, learning objectives, instructional methods, input of staff, budgetary constraints, and available space.

Maintaining class size/student loads within the ranges below maintains educational quality and the School Department’s ability to attract and retain the best possible teachers for Cape Elizabeth’s young people. The Board seeks to balance this interest with the cost of the education of our students.

Keeping the above in mind, the following recommendations shall serve as the general guide for average class sizes K-12:

Higher class sizes may occur for large group instruction in grades 5-12 for special classes, including physical education and instrumental and/or choral music. Smaller class sizes may also occur for specialized courses such as where the elimination of such course might jeopardize student access to future courses or the program itself.

If a class/student load exceeds the recommended size, the Superintendent shall consult with the appropriate building administrator and review the situation before deciding whether to take such steps as hiring additional personnel or using other resources. If a high school or middle school class enrollment falls below 10, the Superintendent shall consult with the principal and decide whether to continue or eliminate the course. The Superintendent will inform the School Board of any decision in this area, and Board approval will be required to hire any additional teacher(s).

The ranges are general guidelines and shall not be considered as minimum or maximum limits. Additionally, the Board recognizes that student load, not class is another important consideration for teachers at the secondary level. Therefore, school administrators of these grade levels will seek to maintain average full-time teacher loads of between 75 and 90 students.

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IJJ - SELECTION OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

Definitions:

Chapter 127 of the Maine Department of Education defines "instructional materials" to include “textbooks and other print materials, software and other electronic materials, and supplies and other materials to support implementation of the system of Learning Results.” "Library-media resources" include “books, written materials, online internet resource materials, multimedia materials and information technology that support the school unit's curriculum.”

Selection of Materials:

The Superintendent, in consultation with administrators and professional staff, is responsible for selecting appropriate educational material (including instructional materials and library-media resources). The Superintendent is responsible for developing any administrative procedures necessary to guide the review and selection of educational materials, and may delegate specific responsibilities to staff as the Superintendent deems appropriate. All administrative procedures must be consistent with this policy. The Superintendent is expected to keep the Board informed about educational materials purchased for the school unit.

Criteria for Selection:

Quality educational materials and resources are essential to student learning and supporting the school unit's educational goals and objectives.

Instructional and library media materials selected should:

  1. Support student achievement of the content standards of the system of Learning Results;
  2. Support the goals and objectives of the school unit's educational programs;
  3. Enrich and support the curriculum;
  4. Take into consideration the varied interest, abilities, and maturity levels of the students served;
  5. Foster respect and appreciation for cultural diversity and varied opinions;
  6. Stimulate growth in factual knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values, ethical standards, and critical analysis;
  7. Provide information that will enable students to make informed decisions in their daily lives;
  8. Be accurate and current;
  9. Reflect high quality scholarship and presentation;
  10. Represent significant authors/composers and works; and
  11. Be affordable.

Selection Procedure:

The highest priority shall be meeting the instructional needs of the individual schools. In meeting this priority, preference shall be given to basic learning materials, i.e., those that are the predominant instructional materials used at particular grade levels or courses and/or are essential to student achievement of Learning Results content standards.

Before selecting/recommending materials for purchase, professional staff should evaluate the existing collection, consult with staff from appropriate departments and/or grade levels, personally review the material, and obtain recommendations/reviews regarding the material from appropriate reputable sources.

In accordance with state regulations, social studies and science textbooks should not be older than five years unless up-to-date supplemental instructional materials are also available.

Multiple copies of materials should be purchased as needed and within budgetary constraints. Worn or missing materials should be replaced as needed. Outdated materials or materials that are no longer in demand should be withdrawn from the collection and/or circulation.

Donated Materials:

Gift materials are judged by the same criteria as materials selected by the school staff and in accordance with any applicable Board policies or procedures on gifts and donations.

Inspection of Materials by Parents and Opt-Out Requests:

A student's parent/guardian may inspect, upon request, any instructional or library media materials used as part of the curriculum. Such requests shall be made to the appropriate teacher or the library media specialist. Access to the materials shall be provided within a reasonable time after such a request is made. The Superintendent may develop any administrative procedures necessary to implement this policy.

If a parent/guardian wishes to restrict their child's access to particular instructional materials, the procedure in Board policy IMBB shall be followed.

Challenged Materials Procedure:

This procedure applies only to requests to remove materials from the school's collection or curriculum. Individual exemption requests are subject to Board policy IMBB. In the event that a student, parent, staff, or community member had a concern regarding particular materials or requests removal of particular material from the curriculum or collection, the following procedure will be followed:

  1. The complainant must discuss their concern first with the person providing the material in question. Individual staff members may discuss concerns, but do not have the authority to remove materials from the curriculum or library collection.

  2. If the complainant is not satisfied, they shall be referred to the building administrator and requested to fill out IJJ-E - Citizen's Challenge to Education Media Form. A copy of the form will be forwarded to the Superintendent.

  3. The Superintendent shall appoint a Committee composed of the following persons to review the complaint: one administrator at the appropriate grade level; one library media specialist; one classroom teacher; the department head in the subject area of the challenged materials; and two community members.

  4. The Committee shall read and examine the materials referred to them; check general acceptance of materials by reading reviews; and weigh the values and faults of the material. Committee members are expected to form opinions based on the material as a whole and not on passages or portions pulled out of context. The Committee should generally be neutral toward viewpoints expressed in materials, and shall ask the Superintendent to consult legal counsel for advice concerning any questions involving freedom of speech or expression. The Committee shall meet to discuss the material and prepare a written report with their recommendations.

  5. The Committee shall provide the final report to the Superintendent, who will inform the complainant of the results.

  6. No material shall be removed from use until the Committee has made a final decision.

  7. The Committee's decision may be appealed to the Board. The Board may set aside a portion of a regular meeting or call a special meeting to review the complaint and the

    Committee’s report, and to receive testimony from representatives of the various points of view. The material in question shall be:

    1. Reviewed objectively and in its full content;
    2. Evaluated in terms of the needs and interests of students, school, curriculum and community;
    3. Considered in the light of differing opinions; and
    4. Reviewed in light of the criteria set forth in this policy.

The Board will announce its decision in writing no later than the conclusion of the next regular meeting of the Board.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


IJJ-E (FORM)- CITIZEN’S CHALLENGE OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA FORM

CITIZEN’S CHALLENGE OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA FORM


Type of Material:

🙿 Book 🙿 Magazine/Periodical 🙿 Film 🙿 Recording

🙿 Software 🙿 Other (please Specify:_______________________________________

Author (if known): ______________________________________________________________

Title: _________________________________________________________________________

Publisher (if known): ____________________________________________________________

Person making complaint: ________________________________________________________ 

Address: _________________________________ Telephone: __________________________

Complaint represents:

🙿 Self

🙿 Organization/Group (please name):

  1. Why do you object to this material?

  2. Identify any particular sections to which you object. (Please be specific: cite pages, scenes, etc.)

  3. What are the positive aspects of this material?

  4. Did you read/view/hear all of the material? If not, what parts did you read/view/hear?

  5. Please identify any professional review/judgments of this material that you have read.

  6. What would you like the school to do about this material?

🙿 Do not assign to any students. 🙿 Withdraw it from the library and/or instructional program.


Signature of Complainant | Date

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

IJND - CAPE ELIZABETH SCHOOL DISTRICT WEBSITE/WEB PAGES

The Cape Elizabeth School District maintains an official website to provide general information about our school system, as well as information about educational programs, extracurricular activities, school events, and student and staff achievements. This website is intended to support the educational mission of the schools, to enhance the curriculum and learning opportunities for students and staff, and to provide valuable information to the larger community about our schools. The website does not create, nor is it intended to create, a public or limited public forum.

The Board recognizes that the schools must establish reasonable controls to protect the privacy of students and staff, to ensure that the website is in compliance with applicable laws, and to ensure that it meets the highest educational and quality standards. The Superintendent shall be responsible for overseeing the implementation of this policy and the accompanying guidelines, and for advising the Board of the need for any future amendments or revisions to the policy or guidelines. The Superintendent may develop additional administrative procedures and/or rules governing the day-to-day management and operations of Cape Elizabeth School District's website, consistent with the Board's policy and guidelines. The Superintendent may delegate specific responsibilities to the Technology Coordinator, District Webmaster, or other individual, as the Superintendent deems appropriate.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


IJNDB - STUDENT COMPUTER AND INTERNET USE

 STUDENT COMPUTER AND INTERNET USE

Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) computers, network, and Internet access are provided to support the educational mission of the schools and to enhance the curriculum and learning opportunities for students and school staff.  This policy and the accompanying rules also apply to laptops, tablets, and other devices  issued directly to students, whether they are used at school or off school premises.  

Compliance with CESD’s policies and rules concerning computer and Internet use is mandatory.  Students who violate these policies and rules may have their computer privileges limited, suspended, or revoked.  The building principal is authorized to determine, after considering the circumstances involved, whether and for how long a student’s computer privileges will be altered.  The building principal’s decision shall be final.

Violations of this policy and CESD’s computer and Internet rules may also result in disciplinary action, referral to law enforcement, and/or legal action.

CESD computers remain under the control, custody, and supervision of the school unit at all times.  The school unit monitors all computer and Internet activity by students.  Students have no expectation of privacy in their use of school computers, whether they are used on school property or elsewhere.

INTERNET SAFETY

CESD uses filtering technology designed to block materials that are obscene or harmful to minors, and child pornography.  Although CESD takes precautions to supervise and monitor student use of the Internet, parents should be aware that the CESD cannot reasonably prevent all instances of inappropriate computer and Internet use by students in violation of Board policies and rules, including access to objectionable materials and communication with persons outside of the school.  The school unit is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of information that students obtain through the Internet.

In the interest of student  Internet safety, CESD also educates students about online behavior, including interacting with other people on social networking sites and in chat rooms, the dangers of engaging in “hacking” and other unlawful online activities, and issues surrounding “sexting” and cyberbullying awareness and response.

The Superintendent/designee shall be responsible for integrating age-appropriate Internet safety training and “digital citizenship” into the curriculum and for documentation of Internet safety training.

IMPLEMENTATION OF POLICY AND “ACCEPTABLE USE” RULES

The Superintendent/designee shall be responsible for implementation of this policy and the accompanying “acceptable use” rules.  Superintendent/designee may implement additional administrative procedures or school rules consistent with Board policy to govern Internet access and the day-to-day management, security, and operations of the school unit’s computer and network systems and to prevent the unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal information regarding minors. 

Students and parents shall be informed of this policy and the accompanying rules through student handbooks, the school website, and/or other means selected by the Superintendent.



Cross Reference:   


Adopted:                

Revised:                 

 


IJNDB-R - STUDENT COMPUTER AND INTERNET USE RULES

These rules accompany Board policy IJNDB (Student Computer and Internet Use). Each student is responsible for their actions and activities involving school unit computers (including tablets, laptops, and other devices issued to students), networks, and Internet services, and for their computer files, passwords, and accounts.

These rules provide general guidance concerning the use of Cape Elizabeth School Department’s computers and examples of prohibited uses. The rules do not attempt to describe every possible prohibited activity by students. Students, parents, and school staff who have questions about whether a particular activity is prohibited are encouraged to contact the building principal or the Director of Educational Technology.

  1. Acceptable Use

    The school unit’s computers, networks, and Internet services are provided for educational purposes and research consistent with the school unit’s educational mission, curriculum, and instructional goals.

    All Board policies, school rules, and expectations concerning student conduct and communications apply when students are using computers, whether the use is on or off school property.

    Students are also expected to comply with all specific instructions from school administrators, school staff or volunteers when using the school unit’s computers.

  2. Consequences for Violation of Computer Use Policy and Rules

    Compliance with the school unit’s policies and rules concerning computer use is mandatory. Students who violate these policies and rules may, after having been given the opportunity to respond to an alleged violation, have their computer privileges limited, suspended, or revoked. Such violations may also result in disciplinary action, referral to law enforcement, and or legal action.

    The building principal shall have final authority to decide whether a student’s privileges will be limited, suspended, or revoked based upon the circumstances of the particular case, the student’s prior disciplinary record, and any other relevant factors.

  3. Prohibited Uses

    Examples of unacceptable uses of school unit computers that are expressly prohibited include, but are not limited to, the following:

    1. Accessing or Posting Inappropriate Materials – Accessing, submitting, posting, publishing, forwarding, downloading, scanning, or displaying defamatory, abusive, obscene, vulgar, sexually explicit, sexually suggestive, threatening, discriminatory, harassing and/or illegal materials or engaging in cyberbullying;

    2. Illegal Activities – Using the school unit’s computers, networks, and Internet services for any illegal activity or in violation of any Board policy or school rules. The school unit assumes no responsibility for illegal activities of students while using school computers;

    3. Violating Copyrights – Copying, downloading, or sharing any type of copyrighted materials (including music or films) without the owner’s permission (see Board Policy EGAD – Copyright Compliance). The school unit assumes no responsibility for copyright violations by students;

    4. Copying Software – Copying software without the express authorization of the Director of Educational Technology. Unauthorized copying of software is illegal and may subject the copier to substantial civil and criminal penalties. The school unit assumes no responsibility for illegal software copying by students;

    5. Plagiarism – Representing as one’s own work any materials obtained on the Internet (such as term papers, articles, music, etc.). When Internet sources are used in student work, the author, publisher, and website must be identified;

    6. Non-School-Related Uses – Using the school unit’s computers, networks, and Internet services for any personal reasons not connected with the educational program or assignments;

    7. Misuse of Passwords/Unauthorized Access – Sharing passwords, using other users’ passwords, and accessing or using other users’ accounts;

    8. Malicious Use/Vandalism – Any malicious use, disruption, or harm to the school unit’s computers, networks, and Internet services, including but not limited to hacking activities and creation/uploading of computer viruses; and

    9. **Unauthorized Access to Blogs/Chat Rooms/Social Networking Sites **– Accessing blogs, chat rooms or social networking sites to which student access is prohibited.

  4. No Expectation of Privacy

    CESD computers remain under the control, custody, and supervision of the school unit at all times. Students have no expectation of privacy in their use of school computers, including email, stored files, and Internet access logs.

  5. Compensation for Losses, Costs, and/or Damages

    The student and his/her/their parents/guardians are responsible for compensating the school unit for any losses, costs, or damages incurred by the school unit for violations of Board policies and rules while the student is using school unit computers, including the cost of investigating such violations. The school unit assumes no responsibility for any unauthorized charges or costs incurred by a student while using school unit computers.

  6. Student Security

    A student is not allowed to reveal his/her/their full name, address or telephone number, social security number, or other personal information on the Internet without prior permission from a teacher. Students should never agree to meet people they have contacted through the Internet without parental permission. Students should inform their teacher if they access information or messages that are dangerous, inappropriate, or make them uncomfortable in any way.

  7. System Security

    The security of the school unit’s computers, networks, and Internet services is a high priority. Any student who identifies a security problem must notify his/her/their teacher immediately. The student shall not demonstrate the problem to others or access unauthorized material. Any user who attempts to breach system security, causes a breach of system security, or fails to report a system security problem shall be subject to disciplinary and/or legal action in addition to having his/her/their computer privileges limited, suspended, or revoked.

  8. Additional Rules for Devices Issued to Students

    1. Devices are loaned to students as an educational tool and are only authorized for use in completing school assignments.
    2. Students and their parents are responsible for the proper care of laptops at all times, whether on or off school property.
    3. Loss or theft of a laptop must be reported immediately to the building principal, and, if stolen, to the local law enforcement authority as well.
    4. The Board’s policy and rules concerning computer and Internet use apply to use of laptops at any time or place, on or off school property. Students are responsible for obeying any additional rules concerning care of laptops issued by school staff.
    5. Violation of policies or rules governing the use of computers, or any careless use of a laptop may result in a student’s laptop being confiscated and/or a student only being allowed to use the laptop under the direct supervision of school staff. The student will also be subject to disciplinary action for any violations of Board policies or school rules.
    6. Parents will be informed of their child’s login password. Parents are responsible for supervising their child’s use of the laptop and Internet access when in use at home.
    7. The laptop may only be used by the student to whom it is assigned.
    8. Laptops must be returned in acceptable working order at the end of the school year or whenever requested by school staff.

Cross Reference:

Revised:


IJOA - FIELD TRIPS AND OTHER STUDENT TRAVEL

FIELD TRIPS AND OTHER STUDENT TRAVEL

The Board recognizes the educational value of school-sponsored trips as a means of supplementing the curriculum and as a vehicle for encouraging and supporting student participation in academic, artistic, and athletic activities, performances and competitions. In addition, some school-sponsored trips may provide social experiences and contribute to the development of a positive school culture.

This policy provides guidance for the various kinds of trips that may be sponsored by the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD).

Field Trips

“Field trip” means a trip that takes place during the school day and is organized and conducted by one or more CESD employees as a means of accomplishing particular curriculum objectives. All students within the class or grade, or curriculum related subgroup within a class, will be eligible to participate.

Field trips must be approved in advance by the building principal.

Teachers and principals will be expected to consider the following factors in the planning and approval of field trips:

  1. Objectives of the proposed trip and the anticipated learning outcomes;

  2. Specific learning activities to be experienced during the trip;

  3. Suitability of the activity and distance traveled to the age of students;

  4.  Mode and availability of transportation;

  5. Parents/guardians are provided with clear information that communicates the trip activities, risks and safety measures being taken. Such information shall be communicated in a language and process that parents/guardians can understand;

  6. Arrangements for meals (if applicable); and

  7. Availability of funding for all necessary expenses through the school budget or other appropriate sources.

In addition, the Board requires that:

  1. Parents/guardians give written permission for field trip participation;

  2. Adequate supervision be provided to maintain discipline and safety and to respond to emergencies;

  3. Students participating in field trips conduct themselves in a manner consistent with Board policies and school rules; and

  4. Any overnight curriculum-related trip must be approved by the Board.

Competition Trips

“Competition trip” means any trip related to an academic, artistic, athletic, or other student competition or performance that involves individual students or teams. Any competition trip that is outside of those scheduled for the year must be approved in advance by the Superintendent. Approval may be contingent upon availability of funding through the school budget or other sources.

Other School-Sponsored Trips

Other school-sponsored trips are those that are organized and conducted by one or more employees of CESD as a supplement to the curriculum, as a class social activity, or as an activity planned by a student club or organization. Such trips may include overnight, long-distance in-state or out-of-state travel, or foreign travel. To be school-sponsored, the trip must relate directly to the curriculum or to activities for which the student club is organized.

Participation in such trips is entirely voluntary. There shall be no extra credit awarded for participation and no loss of credit for not taking a trip.

Participation may be limited to students taking courses related to the purpose of the trip or to students who are affiliated with the student club or organization planning the trip.

The Board must approve, in advance, any trips involving out-of-state travel distance of 125 or more miles to destination and all overnight and foreign trips. Approval may be contingent upon availability of funding from the school budget and other sources, including student fundraising.

Staff or administrators seeking approval for school-sponsored trips must furnish the following information:

  1. Objective of the trip and anticipated outcomes;

  2. Specific experience to be provided;

  3. Number and grade(s) of students;

  4. Criteria for student participation;

  5. Maximum number of students who may participate;

  6. Cost per student, including funds requested from CESD and from individual students;

  7. Fundraising plans (if applicable);

  8.  Transportation arrangements;

  9. Itinerary;

  10. Arrangements for meals and lodging;

  11. Arrangements for adult supervision/chaperones, with a minimum ratio 1:10 students at elementary level and 1:12 students at secondary level.

  12. Plans for safety and emergencies;

  13. Plans for communicating information to parents and obtaining parental permission; and

  14. Accountability for student conduct.

Adequate supervision must be provided to maintain discipline and safety and to respond to emergencies.

Students participating in field trips and other school-sponsored trips must conduct themselves in a manner consistent with Board policy and school rules. Students who violate Board policy or school rules will be subject to disciplinary consequences.

Non-School-Sponsored Travel

Travel organized by Cape Elizabeth School employees, parents or others that is not an extension of the instructional program or school-sponsored activities and has not been approved as a school-sponsored trip in compliance with this policy will be considered a non-school-sponsored trip.

All responsibility for non-school-sponsored trips lies with the individual(s) or group(s) organizing them. The Board accepts no responsibility for non-school-sponsored trips, and organizers should be aware that such trips or excursions are not covered by the CESD’s liability insurance.

To minimize the impact of these trips on the instructional program and operation of the schools, the Board strongly encourages organizers/sponsors to schedule non-school-sponsored trips during weekends and/or vacation periods. Staff members planning or participating in non-school-sponsored travel must notify the building principal of such plans. Student absences due to participation in non-school-sponsored travel will be considered unexcused absences.

Instructional time may not be used to promote the trip or distribute materials. Individuals or groups who wish to use the schools for the purpose for publicizing trips or recruiting participants and parents/chaperones may do so in accordance with the Board’s facilities use policy. Individuals or groups wishing to distribute promotional materials may do so only in accordance with Board policy. Non-school-sponsored trips must not be represented as school functions or as related to, or an extension of, the CESD’s instructional, co-curricular or extracurricular programs.

It is the responsibility of any staff engaging in such trips or activities to notify the parents of prospective and participating students that this is not a school activity, but an independent voluntary trip organized or led by that teacher or staff member. To minimize any risk of misunderstanding, the following statement must be made in any informational meetings or materials promoting the trip:

“This trip is not approved or sponsored by the Board. It has not been reviewed, approved or endorsed by authorized CESD administrators and it is not covered by any of the CESD’s insurance policies''.


Cross Reference:    
EEBB-Use of Private Vehicles or School Buses

KHB-Advertising in the School

KHC-Distribution/Posting of Non-School Materials

JEA-Compulsory Attendance

JEAA-Student Attendance

KF-Community Use of School Facilities

Reviewed:              

January 8, 2019

Adopted:                

February 12, 2019

January 11, 2022

IJOA-E1 - STUDENT TRAVEL/FIELD TRIP AUTHORIZATION FORM

GROUP/TEAM NAME:  

NAME OF FACULTY/TRIP LEADER (MAKING REQUEST):  

DATE(S) OF PROPOSED TRIP:               # OF SCHOOL DAYS:                             # OF NIGHTS AWAY:

TRIP DESTINATION:

PURPOSE/BENEFIT OF TRIP:

TRANSPORTATION ARRANGEMENTS:

# STUDENTS:                     

#CHAPERONES:                            # SCHOOL STAFF:                      #PARENTS/OTHER:

ARRANGEMENT FOR MIXED GENDER SUPERVISION:

COST PER STUDENT:

DESCRIPTION OF ANY FUNDRAISING:

DO ALL MEMBERS OF THE GROUP/TEAM HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE?    YES       NO

IF NOT, DESCRIBE CIRCUMSTANCES:

FOR OVERNIGHT TRIPS:

ALL PARENT/OTHER CHAPERONES HAVE ATTENDED VOLUNTEER TRAINING

DATE/TIME OF PRE-TRIP CHAPERONE MEETING:

FOR OUT OF COUNTRY TRIPSTRAVEL AND CANCELLATION INSURANCE ARRANGEMENTS (ATTACH COPY OF CONTRACT WITH INSURANCE AND CANCELLATION PROVISIONS HIGHLIGHTED).

APPROVAL OF TRAVEL:

Principal or AD: _______________________________________DATE: ______________

Superintendent: _______________________________________DATE: ______________

School Board: _______________________________________DATE: ______________


   All travel must first be approved and recommended by the principal or, in the case of athletic trips, the athletic administrator. The principal and athletic administrator are permitted to approve in-state day trips (no overnight stays) without the endorsement of the Superintendent or School Board.
   Out-of-state trips within New England and in-state requiring no more than one night's stay must be approved by the Superintendent.
   Board approval is required for Trips outside of New England; for all trips requiring two or more overnight stays; and for all trips requiring a per-student cost or fund-raising of $500 or more.
   Travel requests needing approval from the Superintendent of Board should be submitted at least two months of the trip.

Cross Reference: 

Form Revised: 


IJOA-E2 - PARENT/GUARDIAN CONSENT FORM for STUDENT TRAVEL/FIELD TRIP(draft af_6-28-22)

Group or Team: 


# Students attending:


Faculty Leader Name(s):


# of Chaperones: (including Ldr)




Trip Destination:


Trip Date(s):


Anticipated Departure Time:


Anticipated Return Time:




Transportation by:


Driver(s) (if other than school /commercial carrier):




In An Emergency, How Can Trip Leader(s) Be Contacted:




For Overnight Trips:

Accommodations:
Physical address, phone


Provisions for Mixed Gender Supervision:



Pre-Trip Parent Meeting (for Trip involving Three (3) or More Overnights) will be: 

Date:


Location:


Time:


PARENT/GUARDIAN/STUDENT CONSENT

I hereby give my permission for ____________________(student’s name) to participate in the travel/field trip(s) named and described herewith. I acknowledge receipt of the Field Trip Information form for that trip(s). I am comfortable with the arrangements described. I authorize the trip leader(s) to arrange medical treatment in an emergency. I hereby release the trip leader, the field trip(s) chaperones, the school, and the school department (“School”), town of Cape Elizabeth (“Town”), and all of their agents or employees, from any and all claims, liabilities and responsibilities for damages or injuries that my student may experience during this trip, except only any claims for any damages or injuries that may be sustained as a result of any intentionally harmful acts on the part of the trip leader, the chaperone(s), the Town, the School, or their agents or employees. I understand that it is my responsibility to obtain health insurance coverage for medical expenses that may occur.




Parent/Guardian Signature
Date





Student Signature (if 18 or older)
Date



EMERGENCY CONTACT AND MEDICAL INFORMATION FORM




Student Name
Date of Birth



Health Insurance Provider:




Plan/Certificate #:



1st Contact:
Relationship:
Home/Cell Phone:
Work Phone:


2nd Contact:
Relationship:
Home/Cell Phone:
Work Phone:
Non-Parent/Guardian Contact:
Relationship:
Home/Cell Phone:
Work Phone:

Known Allergies? If yes, provide treatment protocols below:


Medication or Treatment Restrictions:


Medication(s) that student will be bringing for self-administration:



Cross Reference: 

Form Revised: 


IJOA-R - STUDENT TRAVEL AND FIELD TRIP GUIDELINES

Guidelines for Board and Superintendent Approval of Extended Travel

While the department administration and the School Board recognize the educational value of off-campus experiences, it should not be assumed that making an application for travel approval means the travel will always be approved. The Board and Superintendent expect that any application for extended travel has sound educational justification and meets the high expectations of the department for student safety and financial equity.

Groups are more likely to gain travel approval if:

  1. There is high education value
  2. The cost per student is not excessive
  3. Minimal school time is missed
  4. There are not equivalent opportunities that are closer and less expensive
  5. Safety concerns have been addressed
  6. Adequate insurance is built into the plan
  7. There is a high degree of student and parent support
  8. There is adequate time and methods to earn money for the trip
  9. There is no pressure placed on non-participating students who are members of the group
  10. The group has been reasonable in its previous travel requests (location and cost) and has had success in previous travel (i.e. not problems)

Overnight trips require a separate consent form that is specific to the particular trip. Overnight trip consent forms must include the nature of all of the activities in which the student will participate, signature line(s), emergency contact telephone numbers, any specific medical needs and conditions, and permission to provide emergency medical care. The Field Trip/Medical Permission Slip shall be taken on the trip by the sponsor.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Reviewed: March 16, 2022 (Policy Committee)

IJOC - SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS

SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS 

The Board supports the use of community resources, including volunteers, to complement and support instructional programs and extracurricular activities in the school. For the purpose of this policy, a volunteer is a person who provides services, without compensation or benefits of any kind or amount, on an occasional or regular basis in schools or in school activities. All volunteers shall be at least 18 years of age unless their volunteer work is part of a class, is done to fulfill a service learning or community service requirement for graduation, or is done by a recognized student organization. Volunteers work in partnership with, under the supervision of, and at the request of school administrators and staff. 

The purposes of the volunteer program are to: 

  1. Assist teachers in providing more individualized instruction and enrichment opportunities for students; assist staff with school projects; supervise or chaperone student activities; and perform clerical work; 
  2. Build an understanding of and support for school programs among interested citizens; and 
  3. Strengthen school/community relations. 

Prospective volunteers must complete an application form, submit two references and sign a confidentiality agreement. In the interest of protecting the safety of students and staff, background checks will be performed for all prospective volunteers, including those chaperoning students on field trips or school-sponsored excursions. Background checks will be repeated every five years. Applications will be screened and approved by the volunteer coordinator. Information collected during this screening process will be treated as confidential to the extent allowed by law. The Superintendent and school principal are authorized to use their discretion to decline an application or terminate the services of a volunteer if they determine it is in the best interests of the school department. 

The school principal/designee must approve all regular volunteer assignments before volunteers begin work. Staff must have their use of volunteers approved in advance by the building principal. Volunteers will only be assigned to staff who request them. Regular volunteers are those who come in on a frequent basis for a specific purpose. The supervising staff member is responsible for giving volunteers a clear understanding of those duties, procedures, and expectations necessary to perform their assignments. 

All volunteers who are approved to work with students and/or in support of school programs are expected to comply with the following requirements. 

  1. Volunteers shall attend any required volunteer orientation/training sessions provided by the school department. Volunteers shall be made aware of applicable policies, procedures, and rules before they undertake their first assignment through a volunteer orientation, volunteer handbook, or other means. 
  2. Volunteers will work with students under the supervision and direction of authorized school staff in the classroom or in a highly visible and accessible open setting. 3. Volunteers shall perform only such duties and tasks specifically approved and assigned by an administrator or supervising staff member. 
  3. Volunteers must keep all student and staff information strictly confidential. This requirement applies even after a volunteer stops performing services for the schools. Volunteers may not access, review, disclose, or use confidential student or staff information except as allowed by federal or state law or regulations. 
  4. Volunteers will conduct themselves in a professional manner and comply with all Board policies, school rules, and directions from school personnel when performing their assigned responsibilities. 
  5. In accordance with Maine law, a member of the Board or a member's spouse may not serve as a volunteer when they have primary responsibility for a curricular or extracurricular program or activity and report directly to the Superintendent or a school administrator except when in compliance with Policy BCB. 
  6. Individuals will refrain from taking and/or posting photographs and/or video of students using personal devices while serving in a volunteer capacity. 

The school unit will provide liability insurance protection for volunteers while performing assigned services. 

The Superintendent/designee will be responsible for devising a method for evaluating the effectiveness of the volunteer program on an annual basis. 

The Board will recognize volunteer service on an annual basis. The building principal will be responsible for appropriate school recognition of volunteers. 

20-A MRSA § 1002 

Cross Reference:

BCB - Board Member Conflict of Interest 

IJOA - Field Trips and Excursions 

EEBB - Use of Private Vehicles for School Business 

Adopted:

February 8, 1994 

Revised:

June 1998 

September 13, 2005 

September 10, 2013 

June 13, 2017 

June 14, 2022




IKAB - STUDENT PROGRESS REPORTS TO PARENTS

The Board believes that there should be continued emphasis on informing parents as to the academic and social progress of their children. Reporting shall occur at no less than the regularly scheduled intervals noted on the district calendar.

Adopted:

Reviewed:

Adopted:

Revised:


IKB - HOMEWORK

Definition and Purpose:

Homework is defined as work and/or studying related to the classroom learning experience that is done outside the regular classroom. This might be accomplished in a school tutoring situation, study hall, small group learning opportunity, learning lab or at home.

The purpose of homework evolves in complexity as the student matures. In the early years, homework is a tool to teach beginning study habits and to encourage learning in all environments.

For the older student, homework takes on more specific roles:

Overarching Philosophy:

Homework is considered an integral component of the overall educational experience in the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD), to one degree or another, depending on grade level and age. Homework should be designed to enrich the learning process, to aid in the mastery of skills and to inspire and stimulate further learning for students.

It should not be expected that homework is mandatory in each subject each night; rather, appropriate and purposeful assignments should call for and encourage an extension of classroom learning. Teachers will use their discretion to determine the need for homework and shall make an effort to offer only meaningful assignments. Teachers have a responsibility to provide an adequate understanding of assignments and also to provide timely feedback, corrections or grades on work given.

Parents are expected to view homework as an important extension of their child’s learning experience, offer assistance in grades 1-4 and assistance and support in grades 5-6. Communication between students, teachers and parents is encouraged to ensure problems are addressed early and the best interests of the student are a top priority.

Finally, homework should never be used as a punishment. It should be viewed as one of many outside learning experiences along with other enrichment opportunities that are highly valued in our community. It is important to help students find a balance of academics, home life and extracurricular activities.

Adopted:

Reviewed:


IKD - HONOR ROLL

The Honor Roll would be as follows for grades 7-12 with the following guidelines:

  1. High Honors: All A’s in all subjects
  2. Honors: B’s or better

If numerical grades are used on report cards, these grades have the following meanings:

99-100 = A+ 83-84 = C+
95-98 = A 79-82 = C
93-94 = A- 77-78 = C-
91-92 = B+ 75-76 = C+
87-90 = B 72-74 = D
85-86 = B- 70-71 = D-
69 and below, fail = F

In order to be on the Honor Roll, a student must meet the following criteria:

REQUESTS TO CHANGE STUDENT GRADES:

Appeals of grades may only be made for reasons allowed by law and must be made within thirty (30) days of the date the grade was issued. Maine law provides that when grades are given for any course of instruction offered by a school, the grade awarded to a student is the grade determined by the teacher of the course and the determination of a student’s grade by that teacher, in the absence of clerical or mechanical mistake, fraud, bad faith or incompetence, is final.

Adopted:

Revised:

Recoded:

Reviewed:


IKE - PROMOTION, RETENTION, AND ACCELERATION OF STUDENTS

It is the Board's intent to provide sequential instructional programming that provides equitable opportunity for students to acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to meet the grade-level learning targets aligned to the Maine Learning Results. The Board recognizes that at every grade level, there are differences among students in their intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development, and that individual students may be more proficient in some content areas than others. While most students will be promoted from one grade to another at the end of the academic year, some students may benefit from retention or acceleration. Decisions concerning promotion, retention, or acceleration of a student should be consistent with the best educational interests of that student.

  1. Criteria
    The following criteria will be used in making decisions concerning promotion, retention, and acceleration:
    1. Student achievement;
    2. Academic potential;
    3. Attendance;
    4. Health;
    5. Social and emotional maturity;
    6. Physical size;
    7. Age in relation to grade placement;
    8. Student attitude;
    9. Parent concerns; and
    10. Program options.
  2. Retention
    Decisions concerning grade-level retention should be made through a conference involving parents, the student's teacher(s), the principal, the guidance counselor, and, as appropriate, other professional staff and/or consultants. This team shall be responsible for reaching consensus regarding retention.
  3. Acceleration
    Decisions concerning grade-level acceleration should be made through a conference involving parents, the student's teacher(s), the principal, the gifted and talented teacher, the guidance counselor, and, as appropriate, other professional staff and/or consultants. The team shall be responsible for making the final recommendation regarding acceleration. Parents dissatisfied with the team's decision may appeal to the Superintendent. The Superintendent's decision shall be final. 

Cross References: 

ADOPTED:

Revised:

IKF - GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The graduation requirements of the Cape Elizabeth School Department (CESD) are designed to ensure that students demonstrate proficiency to the content standards and Guiding Principles of the Maine Learning Results prior to earning a diploma.

Students demonstrate proficiency by earning credit for courses and other approved learning experiences whose curricula are aligned to the content standards and Guiding Principles of the Maine Learning Results.

  1. DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS

    1. Students must earn 230 credits, as follows:

      1. English Language Arts – 40 credits;
      2. Mathematics – 30 credits;
      3. Science – 30 credits, including at least ten credits of laboratory study;
      4. Social Studies – 30 credits, including American history, government, civics, and personal finance;
      5. Visual and Performing Arts – 10 credits;
      6. Industrial and Computer Technology – 5 credits;
      7. Arts or Technology – 5 credits;
      8. Health – 5 credits;
      9. Physical Education – 10 credits;
      10. Electives – 65 credits.
    2. Students who wish to meet these requirements through learning experiences other than Cape Elizabeth’s course offerings may earn credits following prior written approval by the principal, in consultation with the appropriate department chair and school counselor. These learning experiences may include:

    3. Apprenticeships, internships, or fieldwork;

    4. Community service;

    5. Exchange programs;

    6. Independent study;

    7. Alternative education;

    8. Adult education.

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS APPLICABLE TO THE AWARDING OF A CAPE ELIZABETH HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

  1. Students with Disabilities
    Students with disabilities, as defined in 20-A MRSA § 7001(1-B), who satisfy the CESD graduation requirements in the manner specified by their IEP will be awarded a diploma.
  2. Transfer Students
    For students who transfer to Cape Elizabeth High School from an educational program that is not aligned with the content standards and Guiding Principles of the Maine Learning Results, the principal shall determine the value of the student’s prior educational experience toward meeting CESD’s graduation requirements.

  3. Home-schooled Students
    For home-schooled students wishing to receive a diploma from Cape Elizabeth High School, the principal shall determine the value of the student’s prior educational experience toward meeting CESD’s graduation requirements. Home-schooled students must be enrolled at Cape Elizabeth High School for their entire senior year in order to receive a diploma.

  4. Delayed Awarding of Diplomas
    Students who leave Cape Elizabeth High School to attend an accredited degree-granting institution of higher education may, upon satisfactory completion of their freshman year, be awarded a diploma even if they have not met the graduation requirements specified for their class herein.

  5. Early Awarding of Diplomas
    Students who have met CESD’s graduation requirements in fewer than four years of high school may be awarded a diploma with the approval of the principal.

  6. Extended Study
    Students are eligible for extended years of study to complete the requirements of a diploma if they have not reached the age of 20 at the start of the school year. Students eligible for extended years of study may remain at Cape Elizabeth High School or be referred to other programs and resources. Extended study for English learners or students with disabilities shall be specified in their Individual Language Acquisition Plan (ILAP) or IEP, respectively.

  7. Participation in Graduation Ceremonies
    Students must have met all graduation requirements to participate in graduation ceremonies.

  8. Honors, Awards, and Scholarships at Graduation
    In order to be eligible for valedictorian status at graduation, a student must have attended Cape Elizabeth High School for at least three semesters prior to graduation. If a student in attendance at Cape Elizabeth High School for less than three semesters prior to graduation qualifies for the “top ten percent,” the number of students qualifying for that status will be expanded by one for each student meeting this description. Students in attendance for less than three semesters are otherwise eligible, without condition, for all honors, awards, and scholarships.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


IKFA - EARLY GRADUATION

If a student can meet the graduation requirements of their class in less time than the four-year high school sequence, that student can apply for early graduation. In order to apply for early graduation, the student must do the following early in the fall of the year graduation is requested (or the previous spring):

  1. Write a letter explaining the reasons for requesting early graduation in the year preceding the student’s scheduled graduation. This letter is addressed to the school principal and should include the student's post-graduate plans.
  2. Arrange a meeting to include the student, parents, guidance counselor, principal and any appropriate faculty members.
  3. Complete an Early Graduation Form listing courses and credits needed to graduate. High school and college level courses can be used toward graduation. The plan for fulfilling these requirements will be reviewed. The student's reasons for requesting early graduation will be reviewed.
  4. Upon approval, as early graduates, they will be invited to participate in all senior activities relating to graduation.
  5. The high school administration will extend special types of honors recognition to a student who has exemplified superior academic achievement and has chosen to graduate early from CEHS. This recognition would be separate from the honors recognition extended to senior graduates of the high school at the graduation ceremony.
  6. The class ranking of early graduates will take place at the end of four semesters of high school. Early graduates will be ranked in the class with which they entered high school. These students will be ranked with their own class and not with the senior class. Class ranking of seniors (weighted/unweighted) will take place at the end of six semesters of high school. Therefore, early graduates will not receive a weighted class ranking.
  7. Early graduates may be considered for Book Awards in their third year of high school.

Adopted:

Revised:

IKFC - AWARDING OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSE CREDIT PRIOR TO GRADE 9

Cape Elizabeth Middle School (CEMS) students who are approved to take courses at Cape Elizabeth High School (CEHS) will not receive high school credit for those courses.

CEMS students who successfully complete high school courses or other accelerated academic programs may have such courses listed on their CEHS transcript, but they will not be included in calculating grade point average or accruing credits toward high school graduation requirements.

For the purposes of this policy, a student is not considered a high school student until they begin taking courses in the fall of the student’s ninth grade year.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


ILA - STUDENT ASSESSMENT

The Board recognizes that Maine law requires each school administrative unit to use multiple assessment methods to measure student achievement of the learning results set forth in 20-A MRSA § 6209 and Department of Education (DOE) rules implementing that section and other curricular requirements established in § 6209 to inform instruction and to ensure that students are making progress toward achieving the learning results set forth in § 6209 and in DOE rules implementing that section, other curricular requirements and the requirements of a common course of study.

Through this policy, the Board adopts and directs the Superintendent/designee to implement and oversee an assessment system for District schools that will accomplish these objectives. The Superintendent shall be responsible for reviewing the assessment system for compliance with applicable statutes and rules and for certifying to the Commissioner that it is in compliance with Maine Department of Education standards.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:


ILD - STUDENT SURVEYS AND MARKETING INFORMATION

From time to time, the Cape Elizabeth School Department may administer or allow administration of surveys, analyses or evaluations to students in the course of developing and evaluating programs and services offered in the schools. The school unit will comply with the federal Protection of Pupil Rights Act and applicable regulations concerning the administration of surveys and the use of personal information about students for marketing purposes as outlined in this policy.

No student shall be required to participate in a survey, analysis or evaluation receiving funding wholly or partially under U.S. Department of Education programs that reveals the following information:

In the case of surveys not funded under U.S. Department of Education programs, parents/guardians will receive prior notice of the survey and their right to opt-out. Parents/guardians may request that their child not participate in a particular survey by submitting a written request to the Building Principal within five days of receiving the notice.

If actual or expected dates of surveys have been scheduled when the policy is distributed, parents/guardians of affected students will be notified at that time. If surveys are scheduled after the start of the school year, parents/guardians will be provided with reasonable notice before the survey is administered.

Procedure for Inspection of Surveys/Instructional Materials

The Superintendent/designee will be responsible for implementing any procedures necessary t protect the privacy of participating students and to provide parents/guardian with access to surveys within a reasonable time before administration or distribution.

Parents/guardians will be notified of this policy annually at the beginning of the school year and within a reasonable time of any substantive change in policy. Insofar as practicable, parents/guardians will also be notified annually at the beginning of the school year when surveys, analysis, or evaluations are scheduled or anticipated. Parents/guardians shall have the opportunity to opt their child out of participation in any survey, analysis, or evaluation. Students who are 18 years of age or older may opt out of such surveys, analyses, or evaluations.

Use of Student Personal Information for Marketing Purposes

The School Department does not collect, use or disseminate personal information about students for marketing or commercial purposes.

This policy does not prevent the collection, use or dissemination of personal information collected from students for the exclusive purpose of developing, evaluating or providing educational products or services for or to students or educational institutions (including but not limited to tests and assessments, sale by students of products or services to raise funds for school-related purposes, student recognition programs and book clubs or magazines).

Protection of Student Privacy

The Superintendent shall be responsible for ensuring that appropriate measures are taken to ensure that student privacy is protected when surveys are administered or personal information about students is collected, disclosed or used for marketing purposes.

Cross References:

ADOPTED:

Revised:

Reviewed:

Revised:


IMB - TEACHING ABOUT CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES

American academic tradition stresses the free contest of ideas as a vital element both in the development of curriculum and in classroom teaching. The Cape Elizabeth School Department believes that exploring controversial issues is an important part of the educational experience.

Training in reflective and responsive thinking may be incorporated in course offerings at all grade levels. This training is impossible, or at least severely hampered, if the community does not respect the principles of freedom and recognize that dissent does not necessarily mean disloyalty. However, one form of dissent which is incompatible with freedom is that which attempts to end freedom. Irrational fears do just this, and thereby may block the school in its efforts to handle controversial issues in an atmosphere of freedom and thoroughness.

  1. It is the responsibility of the schools to make provisions for the study of controversial issues. 

    1. The policy on controversial issues should be defined in terms of the rights of students rather than in terms of the rights of teachers.
    2. Discussion of controversial issues shall be appropriate to the age, grade, and maturity of the students involved.
    3. The study should be objective and scholarly with a minimum emphasis on opinion and a maximum emphasis on facts and critical thinking. 
  2. In the study of controversial issues, students have the following rights: 

    1. The right to study controversial issues which have political, economic, or social significance and concerning which (at the appropriate level) they should begin to have an opinion;
    2. The right to have access to relevant information;
    3. The right to form and express opinions on controversial issues without thereby jeopardizing relations with the teacher or the school; and
    4. The right to study under competent instruction in an atmosphere free from bias and prejudice. 
  3. Teachers employ the same methods in handling controversial issues as characterize the best teaching at any time. 

    1. Teachers, in selecting both the content and the method of instruction, are mindful of the maturity level of the students.
    2. Teachers have assured themselves that the controversial subject to be discussed belongs within the framework of the curriculum to be covered, that the subject is significant as well as meaningful for the students, and that through the discussion, students will have the opportunity to grow.
    3. Teachers handle the classroom presentation in ways that will ensure a wide range of information and interpretation for students’ consideration and strive to present a balance among many points of view.
    4. Teachers do not use the classroom as a personal forum. Teachers do not employ the techniques of the demagogue or the propagandist for attention, for control, or simply for color. Teachers have the right to identify and express their own point of view in the classroom as long as they indicate clearly that it is their own.
    5. Teachers emphasize keeping an open mind, basing judgment on known facts, looking closely at facts to evaluate them in terms of the subject under discussion, and being ready to change an opinion should new facts come into light.
    6. The emphasis always is on the method of forming an opinion as much as on the opinion formed.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


IMBB - ACCOMMODATION OF SINCERE BELIEFS IN REQUIRED INSTRUCTION

The curriculum of the Cape Elizabeth School Department is designed to meet statutory requirements and includes other areas of study deemed appropriate by the professional staff and the Board. The curriculum includes topics and materials that are age- and ability-appropriate to the students.

The Board acknowledges that from time to time individual students may be exposed to some ideas and materials with which they or their parent/legal guardian do not agree. Students and their parents cannot be required to adopt ideas with which they disagree, but such disagreement alone is not a sufficient basis to exempt a student from the prescribed curriculum. Exemptions from the required curriculum should be minimized because they can detract from the overall instruction provided to the class as a whole and the educational objectives sought to be achieved by the curriculum.

The Board recognizes, however, that there could be topics in the curriculum which may be objectionable to individual students based on their particular, sincerely held religious, moral, or philosophical beliefs. Alteration of instruction which infringes on such beliefs may be requested by the parent/legal guardian.

Requests for accommodations of beliefs in instruction must be made in writing to the building principal and are subject to the approval of the principal. The principal shall notify the Superintendent as soon as practicable of any request for accommodation from instruction and of his/her/their decision. If the principal denies an accommodation request, the parent/legal guardian may appeal to the Superintendent, whose decision shall be final.

In considering requests for accommodation, factors that the principal should consider may include the following:

  1. Whether the course of instruction is required by state law or regulations, or Board policy.
  2. Whether an accommodation will adversely affect the instruction provided to other students.
  3. The educational importance of the material or instruction from which exemption is requested.
  4. Evidence regarding the sincerity of the belief on which the accommodation request is based.
  5. Whether the school has a legal obligation to accommodate the request. In the case of curriculum aligned with the system of learning results, if there is a conflict with the sincerely held religious beliefs of a student or the student’s parent/legal guardian, accommodation in the curriculum shall be made for the student. If the accommodation is so great that the validity of the state assessment system is compromised, the Superintendent will determine how to address this subject to approval of the Commissioner of Education.
  6. Other factors that bear upon the particular request.

When a student is exempted from a portion of the regular curriculum, the staff will make reasonable efforts, within the scope of existing resources, to accommodate alternative instruction for the student. Alternative instruction may be provided by the school or through approved independent study. Any alternative instruction shall be approved in advance by the principal in consultation with the classroom teacher, and shall meet the standards and objectives of the part of the curriculum that is being replaced.

Cross Reference:

Adopted:

Revised:


IMG - ANIMALS IN SCHOOLS


ANIMALS IN SCHOOLS

The Board recognizes that having animals in the classroom can offer valuable student learning experiences but is also concerned with the health and safety of students, staff and visitors and the insurance of humane treatment of animals when they are brought to school. 

For the purpose of this policy “animals” includes mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, insects and fish.

The presence of live animals in the classroom must be directly related to the objectives of the instructional program. Permission is to be obtained from the principal before animals are brought into any school by anyone. 

The following guidelines shall apply to the presence of animals in Cape Elizabeth Schools.

  1. Staff who wish to have animals in the classroom must submit a written request to the principal; the request should include the instructional purpose and activity, the type of animal, the length of time the animal is expected to be present, and a plan for the care of the animal. The principal, at his/her discretion, may approve or deny the request.

  2. Students or parents who wish to bring animals to school for educational purposes must consult with the teacher who, in turn, will request permission from the building principal. All other persons who wish to bring animals to school must obtain written permission, in advance, from the building principal. 

  3. The Superintendent/designee will be responsible for developing procedures to inform parents that animals may be visiting or residing in classrooms during the school year. Parents are expected to notify the school if their child has an allergy or other physical or mental health condition that will be affected by the presence of animals in the classroom. The building principal and staff will respond appropriately when health considerations are brought to their attention. An animal will not be housed in a classroom if a student in that classroom has a documented allergy to the animal.

  4. Health and Safety: Animals that come into schools  must not pose a health and safety risk to any student, employee, or other person at school. A “health” risk may be defined to include both physical and mental health. The interpretation of what poses such a potential risk is left up to the building Principal or his/her designee and is not subject to appeal. An animal will not be brought into a classroom if a student in that classroom has a documented health risk related to animals. If any student or school employee assigned to a classroom in which a therapy dog is permitted suffers an allergic reaction to an animal, the animal will be removed to a different location designated by the administrator. Cleaning procedures will be followed whenever an animal occupies a shared space in the building.

  5. Animals may not be transported in school vehicles.

  6. If animals are to be kept in the classroom on days when classes are not in session,  arrangements for their care will be made by the responsible staff member.

  7. No domestic mammals/pets (including dogs, cats, ferrets, and primates) or livestock will be allowed in school unless current proof of rabies and/or other vaccination is provided. Smaller mammals such as mice, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs, and rabbits do not need to be vaccinated against rabies. Bats, as they may be carriers of rabies, are not allowed in the schools. Parrots, parakeets and other psittacine birds (birds that may carry psittacosis, a severe infectious human respiratory disease) shall not be brought to school unless they have been tested and certified as psittacosis-free. Red-eared turtles (also known as painted turtles) are carriers of salmonella and shall not be kept in the classroom without written documentation from the supplier that they are salmonella-free.

  8. No wild, exotic, aggressive or poisonous animals will be allowed in school unless under the control of an individual trained in the care and management of the animal and properly licensed by state or federal agencies as appropriate (e.g., zookeepers, veterinarians, biologists, Maine Fish and Wildlife personnel). Students will not be permitted to handle such animals. 

  9. No animals will be allowed free range of the classroom or the school. All animals brought to school must be restrained by the owner/handler. The teacher is responsible for the proper supervision and control of students whenever there is an exhibit or activity involving animals in school.

  10. Animals kept in classrooms must be housed in suitable cages or containers and fed and otherwise cared for appropriately. Only the teacher or students designated or supervised by the teacher may be allowed to handle these animals. Animal waste must be removed on an as-needed basis and in a sanitary manner. Only staff members or adult volunteers will be allowed to clean cages or containers or remove animal waste. 

  11. If a student is bitten/injured by an animal on school premises, the building principal, school nurse and parent/guardian must be notified as soon as possible. If a staff member or visitor is bitten/injured, the building principal must be notified. The building principal must notify appropriate public health authorities and the Maine Department of Health and Human Services Center for Disease Control of each incident. An accident/injury report must also be completed and forwarded to the Superintendent.

  12. If a stray or wild animal appears on school grounds, students shall not be allowed in the area until the animal has left the premises or is removed by the local animal control officer, game warden or other appropriate official.

  13. No animal may be used as part of a scientific experiment or for any other purpose in which the normal health of the animal is interfered with or which causes pain or distress. No person may practice vivisection or exhibit a vivisected animal in the schools. Dissection of dead animals shall be confined to the classroom and to the presence of students engaged in the study of dissection and shall not be for the purpose of exhibition.

  14. The Board recognizes that service animals may be used to assist persons with disabilities. This policy does not apply to the presence of service animals that have been or are being specifically trained for the purpose of assisting a person with a disability. 




Cross Reference:


Adopted:                

January 14, 1997

Recoded:                

June 1998

Revised:                 

 


IMGB - THERAPY DOGS & OTHER THERAPY ANIMALS


THERAPY DOGS & OTHER THERAPY ANIMALS

The Cape Elizabeth School Board supports the use of therapy dogs by teachers or other qualified school personnel or contracted services provider (“Owner”) for the benefit of its students subject to the conditions of this policy. The School Board wishes to make clear that a student’s access to a therapy dog is considered an educational opportunity/privilege, and not an educational right.

DEFINITIONS

Therapy Dog: A “therapy dog” is a dog that has been individually trained and certified to work with its Owner to provide emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship to school-aged students. Therapy dogs are not “service animals” as that term is used in the American with Disabilities Act. The dog must be well behaved and have a temperament that is suitable for interaction with students and others in a public school setting. Therapy dogs are personal property of the owner and are not owned by the School Department.

Owner: An individual who owns the therapy dog and who guarantees the therapy dog has been properly trained, certified, vaccinated, and who insures the animal against all potential liabilities. An owner must be either an employee of the district or a contracted service provider. The owner is limited to having one trained therapy dog on school grounds at any given time.

THERAPY DOG STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES 

The following requirements must be satisfied BEFORE a therapy dog will be allowed in school buildings or on school grounds within the Cape Elizabeth Schools:

  1. Request: An Owner who wants to bring a therapy dog to school must submit a written request form to a principal and/or the superintendent for approval. The request must be renewed each school year. The request must also be renewed whenever a different therapy dog will be used.

  2. Training and Certification: The Owner must submit the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen Certification or its equivalent as determined by the Superintendent. The certification must remain current at all times.

  3. Health and Vaccination: The therapy dog must be clean, well groomed, in good health, housebroken, and vaccinated against diseases common to dogs. The Owner must submit proof of current licensure from the local licensing authority and proof of the therapy dog’s current vaccinations from a licensed veterinarian.

  4. Control: A therapy dog must be under the control of the owner through the use of a leash or other tether. The therapy dog must be under the Owner’s control at all times.

  5. Identification: The therapy dog must have appropriate identification identifying it as a therapy dog.

  6. No Disruption: The therapy dog must not disrupt the educational process by barking, seeking attention or any other behavior deemed disruptive.

  7. Health and Safety: The therapy dog must not pose a health and safety risk to any student, employee, or other person at school. A “health” risk may be defined to include both physical and mental health. The interpretation of what poses such a potential risk is left up to the building Principal or his/her designee and is not subject to appeal. A therapy dog will not be brought into a classroom if a student in that classroom has a documented health risk related to dogs. If any student or school employee assigned to a classroom in which a therapy dog is permitted suffers an allergic reaction to the therapy dog, the Owner of the animal will be required to remove the animal to a different location designated by the administrator. Cleaning procedures will be followed whenever a therapy dog occupies a shared space in the building. 

  8. Supervision and Care of Therapy Dogs: The Owner is solely responsible for the supervision and care of the therapy dog, including any feeding, exercising, and clean-up while the animal is in a school building or on school property. The school district is not responsible for providing any care, supervision, or assistance for a therapy dog.

  9. Authorized Area(s): The Owner shall only allow the therapy dog to be in areas within school buildings or on school property that are authorized by school district administrators.

  10. Damages to School Property and Injuries: The Owner of a therapy dog is solely responsible and liable for any damage to school property or injury to personnel, students, or others caused by the therapy dog.

  11. Insurance: The Owner must submit a copy of an insurance policy that provides liability coverage for the therapy dog while on any school property in an amount determined by the Superintendent.


EXCLUSION OR REMOVAL FROM SCHOOL

A therapy dog may be excluded from school property and buildings if a school administrator determines that:

  1. A handler does not have control of the therapy dog;

  2. The therapy dog is not housebroken;

  3. The therapy dog presents a health and safety risk as defined above;

  4. The therapy dog presents a direct and immediate threat to others in the school; or

  5. The animals’ presence otherwise interferes with the educational process.

The Owner shall be required to remove the therapy dog from school premises immediately upon such a determination by school administration.

Other certified therapy animals will be considered if endorsed by the Maine Department of Education for this purpose. The same approval procedures will be utilized.


Cross Reference: 


Adopted: April 11, 2023